Hitting the Road for NYC!

It’s a busy week for me as I prepare to leave town for my first mini-book tour. Most of this information is on the Speaking Schedule page, but I wanted to collect it all here for those interested.

First Stop: Wed. 9/23 @ NYU’s King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center
This presentation (7:00 p.m.) is part of a roundtable sponsored and moderated by Juan González, who is a former Young Lord and the current Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Culture and Civilization (the first US Latin@ to hold this chair). Other roundtable participants include scholars and former Young Lords. Discussion will be followed by a Q&A and a reception. More details can be found here. The livestream can be viewed here if you can’t be in attendance.

Second Stop: Thur. 9/24 @ The Loisaida Center 
This presentation (at 6pm), based on the third chapter of my book, will be presented as part of the ¡Presente! The Young Lords in New York exhibition at The Loisaida Center. Information about the event can be found here. Space is limited to the first 75 people, so don’t be late. Books will be available for purchase at the event and I’ll be more than happy to sign them. Here’s a link for the Facebook event.

Third Stop: Sat. 9/26 @ La Casa Azul Bookstore 
This presentation (at 2pm), will include a short reading, an explanation of the process of researching/writing the book. It will leave lots of time for Q&A and will be followed by a screening of Millie and the Lords. A Facebook event for this is available here. They’ll have plenty of copies of the book available for purchase and, again, I’m happy to sign anyone’s copy.

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UPDATE on Letter to the New York Daily News

Well who would have guessed? One day after submitting my letter to the editors at the NY Daily News in response to the terrible opinion piece by Matthew Hennessey, titled “Today’s New York, Saluting 60s Radicals,” they actually published a version of my letter. Sure, they removed the rebuke of the paper for messing up yet again; but at least a dissenting voice got some column inches.

Here’s what made it into print (and for fun, feel free to compare to the longer version that I posted yesterday):

Heroes, not bullies

Iowa City, Iowa: The Op-Ed by Matthew Hennessey, “Today’s New York, saluting ’60s radicals” (July 27), is an embarrassing and unfair smear of the Puerto Rican community. I want to focus my attention on the last line of the piece, which calls the Young Lords “bullies who weren’t above using terror and intimidation to advance their radical left-wing agenda.” Yes, the Young Lords were an unapologetically leftist organization, but “bullies” who used “terror”? As the author of “The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation,” I can tell you that such editorializing is false and ignores history. It was the Puerto Rican community that was terrorized by the city and its police force. It was the people of El Barrio, the South Bronx, the Lower East Side and elsewhere who were terrorized by slumlords and social services — places like Lincoln Hospital, which had been condemned by the city but continued hacking up poor African-Americans and Puerto Ricans. The Young Lords rose in response to such everyday acts of terror, bullying and structural violence. Darrel Wanzer-Serrano

I guess writing a letter to the editor might actually be worth it in this day and age. If you happen to read the NYDN and have a physical copy of the paper, please Tweet me a picture of the printed letter and I’ll add it below, here.

An Open Letter to the Editors of the New York Daily News

Dear Editors,

Today’s opinion piece by Matthew Hennessey, titled “Today’s New York, Saluting 60s Radicals,” is yet another embarrassing and unfair editorialization of the Puerto Rican community. You would think that the Daily News had learned its lesson after its admittedly deceitful coverage of the 2015 Puerto Rican Day Parade garnered widespread condemnation; but apparently, you have learned nothing.

I want to focus my attention on the last line of the piece, which calls the Young Lords “bullies who weren’t above using terror and intimidation to advance their radical left-wing agenda.” Yes the Young Lords were an unapologetically leftist organization; but “bullies” who used “terror”? This is journalistic sensationalism at its very worst. It’s one thing to have a perspective (even one that’s politically opposed to the revolutionary politics of the Young Lords); but it’s another thing entirely to engage in lazy, faux journalism rooted in fear mongering more than integrity.

As the author of The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation, I can tell you that such editorializing is false and ignores history. The Young Lords didn’t terrorize or bully. Their first direct action campaign revolved around cleaning up the streets of East Harlem. They followed that by doing door-to-door tuberculosis and lead poisoning testing programs. Yes, they took over a church in El Barrio; but that was because it was the only church not serving the community; and the takeover happened only after a prolonged period of petition and protest.

The Young Lords' revised Program and Platform.
The Young Lords’ revised Program and Platform.

Contrary to to what Hennessey wants us to believe, it was the Puerto Rican community who was terrorized by New York City and its police force. They are the ones who brutalized Young Lords members and other Black and Brown people with shocking regularity (and as anyone with a pulse knows, continue to do so today). It was the people of El Barrio, the South Bronx, the Lower East Side, and elsewhere who were terrorized by slumlords, Poverty Pimps, and allegedly helpful social services — places like Lincoln Hospital, which had been condemned by the City but continued hacking up poor African Americans and Puerto Ricans. It was direct action by the Young Lords that helped to change some of those conditions and provide the people of the community with the resources — intellectual, political, and material — to fight injustice.

The Young Lords rose in response to such everyday acts of terror, bullying, and structural violence. They gave their communities hope that they could do something about the conditions that haunted their lives. Through their community education programs, they challenged colonialist misinformation about Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans. They directly confronted racism in their local communities and within the Puerto Rican community itself. They provided health, clothing, and food services to the communities in which they were active. And they helped to spread and inspire joy and celebration about Puerto Rican culture — all of which are things that the current multi-site exhibition titled ¡Presente! The Young Lords in New York (at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, El Museo del Barrio, and the Loisaida, Inc. Center) seeks to address.

Neither bullies nor terrorists, the Young Lords helped people take back their communities and institutions and take a stand against oppression in its many different forms. They worked hard to decolonize their communities through education, direct action, service, protest, art, and more. And for those reasons, we oughtn’t fear their legacy, but celebrate it and find ways to learn from them today.

Sincerely,
Darrel Wanzer-Serrano

 

A shorter version of this blog post was sent to the NY Daily News editors on 7/27/15 at 11:00 a.m.

UPDATE: Part of the letter made it into print. Click here for the full update.

46th Anniversary of the New York Young Lords

On July 26, 1969, the New York Young Lords announced themselves to a public audience at a Tompkins Square Park rally. The next day, they were blocking the streets of El Barrio with trash, protesting both their unsanitary living conditions brought on by willful neglect of their community and the sanitizing force of “the system” — it’s capacity to nullify resistive movements and homogenize difference.

The first New York-rooted, radical Puerto Rican group of the post-McCarthy era, the Young Lords were central to a set of transformations in their community and beyond. This group of young people spoke truth to power and mobilized thousands of supporters in the communities to which they anchored themselves and their activism.

But why, after all of these years, has still so little been written on the New York Young Lords (and even less on the original Chicago chapter or the branches in Philadelphia, Bridgeport, etc.)? Appearing as the main subject of only a handful of articles and book chapters — and appearing, more frequently, as an aside or summation — the memory of Young Lords has circulated like a ghost for leftist Puerto Rican academics. Is it because the group, ultimately, wasn’t instrumentally “successful” in many of their specific interventions? Is it because so much of the scholarship coming out of Puerto Rican studies has focused on older histories, literary and cultural studies, and so on? Who knows; but more work needs to be done.

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My recently released book, The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation (Temple University Press), is one such effort at filling out the history of the Young Lords in New York. Focused largely on the group’s early activism, I craft a critical-interpretive history of the Young Lords to help introduce them to a broader audience. Beyond the historical point, the book is also an effort to enrich our understandings of decolonial praxis and its potentials. Decolonial theory — especially as engaged by scholars from Latin American and Latin@ contexts — has evolved well over the last couple of decades. I believe it can be pushed further via engagement of particulars, of the grounded ways in which people and groups seek to delink from modernity/coloniality in their lived environments.

In the fourth chapter of book, I examine the Young Lords’ “garbage offensive” as an activist moment that speaks to/through multiple gestures of decolonial praxis. As their first direct-action campaign, the Young Lords helped craft the space of El Barrio as a colonized place, one in which broader based efforts at politicizing the residents would be necessary. Crucially, rather than merely asserting themselves in El Barrio, the Young Lords listened to the people in order to discern their needs, which is how they came to the issue of garbage in the first place. In listening to the cries of the dispossessed, the Young Lords engaged in a key practice of decolonial love and went on, further, to model such love in the immediate community and beyond.

Now, there is some question as to how unique activism around garbage was to the Young Lords. As I talk about in the book, there is evidence that a branch of the Real Great Society has engaged in similar garbage protests earlier than the Young Lords. What’s important here, however, is not the question of who did it first, but the different issue how they came about the idea, gave it priority and presence, and cultivated political transformations in the community that could transgress constructions of Puerto Ricans as a political, docile, and so on.

Although my book engages in detailed analyses surrounding the garbage offensive, the church offensive, their transformations surrounding gender, their articulation of revolutionary nationalism, and their engagements of history, more work remains to be done. Aside from a brief mention, I devote little attention to their takeover of Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx. I barely write about the branches that sprouted up outside of New York City. My hope is that others will continue to add to the breadth of the Young Lords’ history in ways that scholars have done with the Black Panthers, the Chican@ movement, and beyond. As one recent report puts it, “The time is ripe for a look back at one of the most potent and political organizations of the 20th century.” Running now through October, ¡Presente! The Young Lords in New York is a multi-site exhibition of Young Lords art and activism at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, El Museo del Barrio, and Loisiada Inc. Through such exhibitions and more scholarship — not to mention reporting in outlets like the Wall Street Journal, Al Jazeera America, and the New York Times — my hope is that memory of the Young Lords can live on and continue to inform public debates and activism now and into the future.

 

**A version of this post first appeared on the Temple University Press Blog.

What is the National Puerto Rican Day Parade to a Boricua in Iowa?

I’ve never lived in a Puerto Rican stronghold. Aside from my three years in Texas and a postdoc in a Latina/o studies program in Illinois, I’ve never really lived or worked in a big Latin@ community, either. And somehow — despite all the research and other trips over the years — I’ve never been in New York City in mid-June. While I’ve watched, in awe, the glorious spectacle that is the Puerto Rican Day Parade, I’ve never experienced it in person. So what does the annual National Puerto Rican Day Parade today mean to me? Continue reading “What is the National Puerto Rican Day Parade to a Boricua in Iowa?”

Readings to Celebrate Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans

It’s a big weekend for Puerto Ricans in New York! The annual “National Puerto Rican Day Parade” in Manhattan will run from 11am-5pm EDT on Sunday June 14 and the parade returns to Brooklyn’s Sunset Park with a parade that goes from 5-8:30pm. Beyond pride in being Puerto Rican, Boricuas from around the world will also be celebrating a rich cultural heritage and a long history. As I write about in my new book, the Young Lords (in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, and elsewhere) are a key part of that history in the diaspora.

With that history and heritage in mind, I wanted to offer a list of books on Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans that can and does enrich and inform the coming celebrations. The list is history-heavy because that’s what I’m more familiar with and it’s also what people have been talking about in the lead-up to the parades. Due to the way Amazon’s links work, I’ve limited the list to some recent books only … with the exception of the first, which is an amazing entry point into Puerto Rican history, literature, culture, politics, etc. Another recent list includes 26 must-reads (most of which I’m not including here) that you should check out as well.  In no particular order, here are the books (with descriptions from Amazon). Continue reading “Readings to Celebrate Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans”

Lysistrata Sex Strikes in Ukraine? The Young Lords Did It, Too….

Popping up on my Facebook page today was this story about Ukrainian women launching a sex strike against Russian men. The article on The Atlantic recounts that the Ukrainian women are certainly not the first to do it:

Of course, the women of “Don’t Give It to a Russian” are hardly the first to have this idea. Just last month, a group of women in Tokyo threatened not to sleep with any man who voted for a gubernatorial candidate who was seen to have outdated views on gender. In 2003, a group called the Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace led a sex strike for an end to the Liberian civil war. And just a few years ago in Ukraine, the feminist group Femen called on the wives and girlfriends of the members of the prime minister’s cabinet to boycott sex in opposition to what they called the prime minister’s “caddish and humiliating attitude towards Ukrainian women.”

It is, in fact, a strategy as old as time. In the Greek comedy Lysistrata, the eponymous character rallies her fellow women to withhold sex from their husbands until they agree to end the Peloponnesian War. For what it’s worth, it worked for the women in the play.

I find it interesting that the article, in a U.S. American magazine, declines to make any connections to similar kinds of resistance within the U.S. Could it be that only folks outside our national borders could make such devious (non-)use of sex? Of course not! Although I’m sure there are many more examples of Lysistrata-style sexual strikes, the one with which I’m most familiar comes from the New York Young Lords.

In 1970, women in the Young Lords began meeting as part of a women’s caucus to discuss issues of racist-sexism (machismo) in society at large and within the structures of their organization. Facing pressure to stop the meetings — they were charged with “talking some of that crazy feminist bullshit” and with being “a bunch of white women” — they considered separating from the males in the organization and, according to one former Young Lord, “rejected that as being counterrevolutionary. We examined it; we talked about it; we critiqued it.” Also considered was the option of joining the Third World Women’s Alliance, a U.S.-women of color feminist organization challenging racism, imperialism, and sexism.

Rather than either disband the women’s caucus or split from the Young Lords, the women instead sought ways to resist. For example, women who were in intimate relationships with Young Lords men held a special meeting to discuss Aristophanes’ LysistrataIn that meeting, they decided that they would no longer have sexual relations with their male partners until the central committee and organization were reformed. Denise Oliver recalls, “We knew we couldn’t go on strike because that would mean all of the programs for the people would collapse. That would be counterrevolutionary—we were not going to not do our work. And we were certainly going to not have anything to do with them that we were related to at all. ‘Hello. The revolution stops right here at the bedside.'”

While the sexual strikes, which lasted several weeks, weren’t a total success on their own, they played a clear role in heightening tensions within the organization and generating some of the conditions for substantive change.  Lysistrata-style strikes aren’t just things that happen somewhere “out there”; they’ve taken place right here along with countless other forms of resistance to racist sexism in our colonial antiblack world. Such stories need to become more commonplace so that young people today have more inventional resources, what some of us rhetorical scholars call touchstones, to stylize modes of resistive engagement in our present(s) and future(s).

Do readers know of any other examples of Lysistrata-style strikes in the U.S.? Feel free to reply on Twitter or Facebook and/or leave them in the comments, here.

The New Palante Is Out (and Why You Should Care)

Perhaps I order too many books, which Is probably an occupational hazard for folks in my line of work. As such, I often don’t pay close attention to emails with the subject line “Your Amazon.com order has shipped.” Today, I’m glad that I looked because my copy of Palante: Voices and Photographs of the Young Lords, 1969-1971 is on its way. This re-release and re-naming of the 1971 Palante: Young Lords Party, which has been out of print for a long time, adds an introduction by Iris Morales, filmmaker and Young Lord, and promises to be a great addition to the resources available on the organization. So why should you care? Here are a couple of reasons.  Continue reading “The New Palante Is Out (and Why You Should Care)”

Finishing Things in New York

Okay … so in case it wasn’t perfectly clear before, y’all should know now that I’m a bad blogger. Here I am, sitting in a coffee shop just hours before I leave the City, and I’m realizing that I haven’t posted a single blog entry in over a week. Let me take a little bit of time to catch y’all up so that, in my next entry, the kinds of reflections I have about doing technologically enhanced archival research have some context. Continue reading “Finishing Things in New York”

Day 2: First Day Actually Researching

After begging and pleading, first thing this morning, with management about letting me keep my room despite the overbooking situation (a plea that was successful!), I headed off to the Tamiment for some good old fashioned archival research. To my rhetorician friends: if you haven’t done a project that requires you to get dirty in an archive, and to physically handle old documents that few even know exist, then you’re really missing out! I knew, in doing prior research, that the Young Lords flyered a lot, made numerous pamphlets, etc. Those kinds of things don’t survive, or so I thought.  Continue reading “Day 2: First Day Actually Researching”