Hitting the Road for NYC!

It’s a busy week for me as I prepare to leave town for my first mini-book tour. Most of this information is on the Speaking Schedule page, but I wanted to collect it all here for those interested.

First Stop: Wed. 9/23 @ NYU’s King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center
This presentation (7:00 p.m.) is part of a roundtable sponsored and moderated by Juan González, who is a former Young Lord and the current Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Culture and Civilization (the first US Latin@ to hold this chair). Other roundtable participants include scholars and former Young Lords. Discussion will be followed by a Q&A and a reception. More details can be found here. The livestream can be viewed here if you can’t be in attendance.

Second Stop: Thur. 9/24 @ The Loisaida Center 
This presentation (at 6pm), based on the third chapter of my book, will be presented as part of the ¡Presente! The Young Lords in New York exhibition at The Loisaida Center. Information about the event can be found here. Space is limited to the first 75 people, so don’t be late. Books will be available for purchase at the event and I’ll be more than happy to sign them. Here’s a link for the Facebook event.

Third Stop: Sat. 9/26 @ La Casa Azul Bookstore 
This presentation (at 2pm), will include a short reading, an explanation of the process of researching/writing the book. It will leave lots of time for Q&A and will be followed by a screening of Millie and the Lords. A Facebook event for this is available here. They’ll have plenty of copies of the book available for purchase and, again, I’m happy to sign anyone’s copy.

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Finishing Things in New York

Okay … so in case it wasn’t perfectly clear before, y’all should know now that I’m a bad blogger. Here I am, sitting in a coffee shop just hours before I leave the City, and I’m realizing that I haven’t posted a single blog entry in over a week. Let me take a little bit of time to catch y’all up so that, in my next entry, the kinds of reflections I have about doing technologically enhanced archival research have some context. Continue reading “Finishing Things in New York”

Day 2: First Day Actually Researching

After begging and pleading, first thing this morning, with management about letting me keep my room despite the overbooking situation (a plea that was successful!), I headed off to the Tamiment for some good old fashioned archival research. To my rhetorician friends: if you haven’t done a project that requires you to get dirty in an archive, and to physically handle old documents that few even know exist, then you’re really missing out! I knew, in doing prior research, that the Young Lords flyered a lot, made numerous pamphlets, etc. Those kinds of things don’t survive, or so I thought.  Continue reading “Day 2: First Day Actually Researching”

Day 1: Getting to New York City

So today was certainly an adventure. I left the house at 6am for my 8AM flight out of DFW. 8AM turned into 8:20, which turned into 9AM, which turned back into 8:30. All lies, I came to find out, as we were plagued with issues: the plane was too heavy, so some people got bribed onto another flight; the plane was still to heavy, so we had to burn fuel while still on the ground; there was a mechanical problem, but the pilots assured us they had it fixed; American Airlines felt differently, so they recalled the plane to verify the fix themselves; then, finally, after over two hours, we were instructed to deplane and move to a different gate and plane. Basically, we got delayed 4 hours, which killed any chance of getting oriented in the archives today. My adventures, however, didn’t stop upon landing….  Continue reading “Day 1: Getting to New York City”

Critical Ethnic Studies (Some Reflections for NCAers)

Yesterday was the first day of the Critical Ethnic Studies conference at UC-Riverside. Framed around the topic of “Settler Colonialism and the Future of Genocide,” this is a well attended, exciting, and rigorous conference that compels all in attendance to rethink not only systems of domination and power rooted in ethnoracial constructs, but also our own complicity in those systems. I’ll possibly have a couple of posts to make after it’s all over; but I wanted to post a point for reflection now, especially as so many people I know are finalizing their proposals for next year’s National Communication Association convention.  Continue reading “Critical Ethnic Studies (Some Reflections for NCAers)”